Tag Archives: Vault 7

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #20 – CouchPotato

CouchPotato enabled CIA agents to remotely use the tool to stealthily collect RTSP/H.264 video streams (RTSP/H.264: Real Time Streaming Protocol is a network control protocol designed for use in entertainment and communication systems and is a control mechanism for streaming media servers).

The tool provided CIA operatives with a number of options:

  • Collect the media stream as a video file (AVI);
  • Capture still images (JPG) of frames from the media stream;
    • This function was capable of being triggered only when there was change (threshold setting) in the pixel count from the previous capture;

The tool uses FFmpeg to encode and decode video and images and Real Time Streaming Protocol connectivity. The CouchPotato tool works stealthily without leaving any evidence on the attacked systems facilitated by ICE v3 “Fire and Collect” loader.

This is an in-memory code execution (ICE) technique that runs malicious code without the module code being written to the disk.

Neither Wikileaks, nor the leaked user guide explains how the agency penetrates the attacked systems, but as many CIA malware, exploits and hacking tools have already leaked in the Vault 7 publications, the agency has probably used CouchPotato in combination with other tools.” – TAD Group

The 10th August 2017 WikiLeaks release overview:

“Today, August 10th 2017, WikiLeaks publishes the the User Guide for the CoachPotato project of the CIA. CouchPotato is a remote tool for collection against RTSP/H.264 video streams. It provides the ability to collect either the stream as a video file (AVI) or capture still images (JPG) of frames from the stream that are of significant change from a previously captured frame. It utilizes ffmpeg for video and image encoding and decoding as well as RTSP connectivity. CouchPotato relies on being launched in an ICE v3 Fire and Collect compatible loader.”

One document was published alongside this release:

CouchPotato v1.0 — User Guide

Previous and subsequent Vault 7 WikiLeaks CIA document dump synopses are available via the Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault 7 Leaks

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Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #18 – UCL / Raytheon

In November 2014, Raytheon announced its acquisition of Blackbird Technologies. This acquisition expanded Raytheon’s special operations capabilities in several areas including:

  • Tactical Intelligence
  • Surveillance and reconnaissance
  • Secure tactical communications
  • Cybersecurity

Raytheon stated that their existing capabilities were now augmented by the Blackbird Technologies acquisition “across a broad spectrum of globally dispersed platforms and communications networks”. Blackbird Technologies was synergistic with Raytheon’s existing expertise and capabilities specifically in the areas of:

  • Sensors
  • Communications
  • Command & Control

This document dump contains suggested PoC’s for malware attack vectors. Raytheon Blackbird Technologies acted as a “kind of “technology scout” for the Remote Development Branch (RDB) of the CIA”.

They analysed malware attacks in the public domain and then gave the CIA recommendations for malware projects. These suggestions by RBT to the CIA were in line with the agencies stated objectives. These malware recommendations benefitted from data derived from “test deployments” in the field by other malware actors. Weaknesses in legacy deployments were assessed and designed out in the CIA versions.

The 19th July 2017 WikiLeaks release overview:

Today, July 19th 2017, WikiLeaks publishes documents from the CIA contractor Raytheon Blackbird Technologies for the “UMBRAGE Component Library” (UCL) project. The documents were submitted to the CIA between November 21st, 2014 (just two weeks after Raytheon acquired Blackbird Technologies to build a Cyber Powerhouse) and September 11th, 2015. They mostly contain Proof-of-Concept ideas and assessments for malware attack vectors – partly based on public documents from security researchers and private enterprises in the computer security field. Raytheon Blackbird Technologies acted as a kind of “technology scout” for the Remote Development Branch (RDB) of the CIA by analysing malware attacks in the wild and giving recommendations to the CIA development teams for further investigation and PoC development for their own malware projects.

Forty One (41) documents accompanied this release:

  1. 11 September, 2015 (S//NF) CSIT 15083 — HTTPBrowser
  2. 11 September, 2015 (S//NF) CSIT 15085 — NfLog
  3. 11 September, 2015 (S//NF) Symantec — Regin – Stealthy Surveillance
  4. 11 September, 2015 (S//NF) FireEye — HammerToss – Stealthy Tactics
  5. 11 September, 2015 (S//NF) VB — Gamker
  6. 4 September, 2015 (S//NF) SentinelOne – Rombertik
  7. 4 September, 2015 (S//NF) FireEye – Window into Russian Cyber Ops
  8. 4 September, 2015 (S//NF) MalwareBytes — HanJuan Drops New Tinba
  9. 4 September, 2015 (S//NF) Cisco — Rombertik
  10. 4 September, 2015 (S//NF) RSA — Terracotta VPN
  11. 28 August, 2015 (S//NF) Dell SecureWorks — Sakula
  12. 28 August, 2015 (S//NF) CSIT 15078 — Skipper Implant
  13. 28 August, 2015 (S//NF) Symantec — Evolution of Ransomware
  14. 28 August, 2015 (S//NF) CSIT 15079 — Cozy Bear
  15. 28 August, 2015 (U) McAfee DLL Hijack — PoC Report
  16. 28 August, 2015 (U) HeapDestroy – DLL Rootkit — PoC Report
  17. 21 August, 2015 (S//NF) TW — WildNeutron
  18. 21 August, 2015 (S//NF) NMehta — Theories on Persistence
  19. 21 August, 2015 (S//NF) CERT-EU — Kerberos Golden Ticket
  20. 21 August, 2015 (S//NF) VB Dridex 2015 — Dridex
  21. 14 August, 2015 (S//NF) Symantec — Black Vine
  22. 14 August, 2015 (S//NF) CSIR 15005 — Stalker Panda
  23. 14 August, 2015 (S//NF) CSIT 15016 — Elirks RAT
  24. 14 August, 2015 (S//NF) Eset — Liberpy
  25. 14 August, 2015 (S//NF) Eset — Potao
  26. 7 August, 2015 (U) Sinowal Web Form Scraping — PoC Report
  27. 7 August, 2015 (S//NF) MIRcon — Something About WMI
  28. 7 August, 2015 (U) PoC Report — Anti-Debugging and Anti-Emulation
  29. 7 August, 2015 (S//NF) SY 2015 — Butterfly Attackers
  30. 7 August, 2015 (S//NF) Symantec — ZeroAccess Indepth
  31. 7 August, 2015 (S//NF) CI 2015 — PlugX 7.0
  32. 7 August, 2015 (U) Mimikatz Password Scanning Analysis — PoC Report
  33. 7 August, 2015 (S//NF) TrendMicro — Understanding WMI Malware
  34. 4 August, 2015 (S//NF) CanSecWest 2013 — DEP/ASLR Bypass Without ROP/JIT
  35. 26 June, 2015 (U) Software Restriction Policy: A/V Disable — PoC Report
  36. 26 June, 2015 (U) WMI Persistence Proof of Concept — Supplemental Report
  37. 29 May, 2015 (U) Mimikatz PoC Report
  38. 29 May, 2015 (U) Pony / Fareit PoC Report
  39. 26 January, 2015 (U) SIRIUS Pique Proof-of-Concept Delivery — User-Mode DKOM — Final PoC Report
  40. 29 December, 2014 (U) SIRIUS Pique Proof-of-Concept Delivery — Direct Kernel Object Manipulation (DKOM) — Interim PoC Report
  41. 21 November, 2014 (U) Direct Kernel Object Manipulasiton (DKOM) — Proof-of-Concept (PoC) Outline 21 November, 2014

Previous and subsequent Vault 7 WikiLeaks CIA document dump synopses are available via the Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault 7 Leaks

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Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #19 – Dumbo

Dumbo is a capability to suspend processes utilizing webcams and corrupt any video recordings that could compromise a PAG deployment. The PAG (Physical Access Group) is a special branch within the CCI (Center for Cyber Intelligence); its task is to gain and exploit physical access to target computers in CIA field operations. *

Vault7 Projects - Images - AAC Dumbo - PAG

The 3rd August 2017 WikiLeaks release overview:

Today, August 3rd 2017 WikiLeaks publishes documents from the Dumbo project of the CIA. Dumbo is a capability to suspend processes utilizing webcams and corrupt any video recordings that could compromise a PAG deployment. The PAG (Physical Access Group) is a special branch within the CCI (Center for Cyber Intelligence); its task is to gain and exploit physical access to target computers in CIA field operations. Dumbo can identify, control and manipulate monitoring and detection systems on a target computer running the Microsoft Windows operating sytem. It identifies installed devices like webcams and microphones, either locally or connected by wireless (Bluetooth, WiFi) or wired networks. All processes related to the detected devices (usually recording, monitoring or detection of video/audio/network streams) are also identified and can be stopped by the operator. By deleting or manipulating recordings the operator is aided in creating fake or destroying actual evidence of the intrusion operation. Dumbo is run by the field agent directly from an USB stick; it requires administrator privileges to perform its task. It supports 32bit Windows XP, Windows Vista, and newer versions of Windows operating system. 64bit Windows XP, or Windows versions prior to XP are not supported.

Log Excerpt:

Vault7 Projects - Images - AAC Dumbo - LOG

Eight documents were also published alongside this release:

Dumbo v3.0 — Field Guide

Dumbo v3.0 — User Guide

Dumbo v2.0 — Field Guide

Dumbo v2.0 — User Guide

Dumbo v1.0 — TDR Briefing

Dumbo v1.0 — User Guide

Dumbo Epione v1.0 — TDR Briefing

Dumbo Epione v1.0 — User Guide

Previous and subsequent Vault 7 WikiLeaks CIA document dump synopses are available via the Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault 7 Leaks

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Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #17 – Imperial: Achilles, SeaPea, & Aeris

These leaked documents relate to a CIA project codenamed ‘Imperial’, they include details of three CIA hacking tools and implants that have been designed to compromise computers running Apple Mac OS X and different Linux distributions. *

The three hacking tools are:

  1. Achilles – A tool to trojanize a legitimate OS X disk image (.dmg) installer;
  2. SeaPea – A Stealthy Rootkit For Mac OS X Systems;
  3. Aeris – An Automated Implant For Linux Systems.

The 27th July 2017 WikiLeaks release overview:

Today, July 27th 2017, WikiLeaks publishes documents from the Imperial project of the CIA. Achilles is a capability that provides an operator the ability to trojan an OS X disk image (.dmg) installer with one or more desired operator specified executables for a one-time execution. Aeris is an automated implant written in C that supports a number of POSIX-based systems (Debian, RHEL, Solaris, FreeBSD, CentOS). It supports automated file exfiltration, configurable beacon interval and jitter, standalone and Collide-based HTTPS LP support and SMTP protocol support – all with TLS encrypted communications with mutual authentication. It is compatible with the NOD Cryptographic Specification and provides structured command and control that is similar to that used by several Windows implants. SeaPea is an OS X Rootkit that provides stealth and tool launching capabilities. It hides files/directories, socket connections and/or processes. It runs on Mac OSX 10.6 and 10.7.

Vault7 Projects - Images - HackRead Imperial

Three documents were also published alongside this release:

Achilles — User Guide

The malware has been tested to be compatible with Intel processors running 10.6 OS.

SeaPea — User Guide

This hack was written in 2011. It is listed as “tested” on OS X 10.6/Snow Leopard and Mac OS X 10.7/Lion. The malware works by assigning processes to any one of the three categories namely: Normal, Elite, and Super-Elite. ** The commands in SeaPea are executed as Elite processes.

Aeris — Users Guide

The coding for the Aeris hacking tool was done in C and it affects the following systems:

Debian Linux 7 (i386), Debian Linux 7 (amd64), Debian Linux 7 (ARM), Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 (i386), Red Hat Enterprise Linux 6 (amd64), Solaris 11 (i386), Solaris 11 (SPARC), FreeBSD 8 (i386), FreeBSD 8 (amd64), CentOS 5.3 (i386) and CentOS 5.7 (i386). ***

Previous and subsequent Vault 7 WikiLeaks dumps synopses are available on WikiLeaks and also see further analysis of Imperial at HackRead and The Hacker News.

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Header image courtesy of The Hacker News (Twitter @TheHackersNews) & in-article image courtesy of HackRead (Twitter @HackRead)

* Content courtesy of Pierluigi Paganini “Security Affairs” article  WikiLeaks published another batch of classified documents from the CIA Vault 7 leak, it includes details of the Imperial project

** References from content courtesy of HackRead – Twitter @HackRead

*** References from content courtesy of The Hacker News – Twitter @TheHackersNews

Quick Reference Resource Introduction: WikiLeaks CIA Vault 7 Leaks

This series covers links to and analysis of each of the WikiLeaks CIA Vault 7 leaks including:

  1. The WikiLeaks pages;
  2. The associated CIA documents – Specification Documents, Systems Requirements, Installation Guides, User Guides, User Manuals, Test Plans, Tactics Documents, Slides and so on;
  3. Links to external references and sources including The Hacker News (Twitter @TheHackersNews), HackRead (Twitter @HackRead), and Pierluigi Paganini at “Security Affairs”; 
  4. Analysis by other third party publications of each leak;
  5. General comments, notes, and links added by AirGap Anonymity Collective as each leak and its previous deployment is more clearly understood;
  6. How these posts will evolve over time:
    1. The first post will be a generic description of each leak including 1-3 above; 
    2. Content will be added over time and date-stamped to include:
      1. Articles, external resources, and commentary that augment the knowledge base with respect to the basic content of each leak; 
      2. Advice on counter-measures / new research; 
      3. Analysis and examples of the subsequent deployment (in the original form or altered) of these hacking tools by cyber criminals, cyber terrorists, state actors, hackers, and others;
      4. Other information that does not emanate from generic or main stream media sources; 

These documents are marked with various security classifications. To understand what these classifications mean see Understanding NSA / INR Security Classifications on Intelligence Assessments;

Posts in this series to date:

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #14 – OutlawCountry;

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #15 – BothanSpy & Gyrfalcon;

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #16 – HighRise;

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #17 – Imperial: Achilles, SeaPea, & Aeris

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #18 – UCL / Raytheon

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #19 – Dumbo

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #20 – CouchPotato

All third party content is explicitly acknowledged and content or imagery that has been altered or amended for ease of use is clearly marked.  

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Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #14 – OutlawCountry

The OutlawCountry Linux hacking tool consists of a kernel module, which the CIA hackers load via shell access to the targeted system and create a hidden Netfilter table with an obscure name on a target Linux user. The OutlawCountry project allows the CIA hackers to redirect all outbound network traffic on the targeted computer to CIA controlled computer systems for exfiltrate and infiltrate data. *

Although the installation and persistence method of the OutlawCountry tool is not described in detail in the document, it seems like the CIA hackers rely on the available CIA exploits and backdoors to inject the kernel module into a targeted Linux operating system. However, there are some limitations to using the tool, such as the kernel modules only work with compatible Linux kernels. **

The 30th June 2017 WikiLeaks release overview:

“Today, June 30th 2017, WikiLeaks publishes documents from the OutlawCountry project of the CIA that targets computers running the Linux operating system. OutlawCountry allows for the redirection of all outbound network traffic on the target computer to CIA controlled machines for ex- and infiltration purposes. The malware consists of a kernel module that creates a hidden netfilter table on a Linux target; with knowledge of the table name, an operator can create rules that take precedence over existing netfilter/iptables rules and are concealed from an user or even system administrator. The installation and persistence method of the malware is not described in detail in the document; an operator will have to rely on the available CIA exploits and backdoors to inject the kernel module into a target operating system. OutlawCountry v1.0 contains one kernel module for 64-bit CentOS/RHEL 6.x; this module will only work with default kernels. Also, OutlawCountry v1.0 only supports adding covert DNAT rules to the PREROUTING chain.

Two documents were also published alongside this release:

OutlawCountry v1.0 User Manual

OutlawCountry v1.0 Test Plan

Previous and subsequent Vault 7 WikiLeaks dumps #1 – #13 and #15 – #17 synopses are available on WikiLeaks and analysis of OutlawCountry at The Hacker News.

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Edited Image courtesy of The Hacker News – Twitter @TheHackersNews

* Content courtesy of The Hacker News – Twitter @TheHackersNews

** Content courtesy of The Hacker News – Twitter @TheHackersNews

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #15 – BothanSpy & Gyrfalcon

BothanSpy is Microsoft Windows implant that targets the SSH client program Xshell and steals user credentials for all active SSH sessions. Gyrfalcon is a CentOS, Debian, RHEL, SUSE, and Ubuntu Linux Platform implant that targets the OpenSSH client not only steals user credentials of active SSH sessions but is also capable of collecting full or partial OpenSSH session traffic. Both implants save the collected information in an encrypted file for later exfiltration while the BothanSpy implant also implements exfiltration in real time to a CIA server thus leaving no footprint on the target system storage disk(s).

The 6th July 2017 WikiLeaks release overview:

“Today, July 6th 2017, WikiLeaks publishes documents from the BothanSpy and Gyrfalcon projects of the CIA. The implants described in both projects are designed to intercept and exfiltrate SSH credentials but work on different operating systems with different attack vectors. BothanSpy is an implant that targets the SSH client program Xshell on the Microsoft Windows platform and steals user credentials for all active SSH sessions. These credentials are either username and password in case of password-authenticated SSH sessions or username, filename of private SSH key and key password if public key authentication is used. BothanSpy can exfiltrate the stolen credentials to a CIA-controlled server (so the implant never touches the disk on the target system) or save it in an enrypted [sic] file for later exfiltration by other means. BothanSpy is installed as a Shellterm 3.x extension on the target machine. Gyrfalcon is an implant that targets the OpenSSH client on Linux platforms (centos,debian,rhel,suse,ubuntu). The implant can not only steal user credentials of active SSH sessions, but is also capable of collecting full or partial OpenSSH session traffic. All collected information is stored in an encrypted file for later exfiltration. It is installed and configured by using a CIA-developed root kit (JQC/KitV) on the target machine.

Three documents were also published alongside this release BothanSpy V1.0 Tool Documentation, Gyrfalcon V2.0 User’s Guide, and Gyrfalcon 1.0 User Manual.

Previous and subsequent Vault 7 WikiLeaks dumps #1 – #14 and #16 synopses are available on WikiLeaks and analysis of BothanSpy & Gyrfalcon at The Hacker News.

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Edited Image courtesy of The Hacker News – Twitter @TheHackersNews – Original Image edited to add extract from BothanSpy Tool Documentation Page 8 Screenshot 07/16/2017.