Tag Archives: DDI

Software Industry Greed is Driving the Assault on our Privacy & Security

The motivation to release software, without proper testing, in order to generate a quick buck is as much of a threat to our security and privacy as the activities of hackers and alphabet agencies. It is time that software companies started to pay the price for the sorry mess that their greed is helping to create.

Once upon a time these matters could be considered in isolation but with the “Internet of Things” connecting millions more devices every day we are headed for a world that will have 28 billion IoT devices by 2020.

Consumer concern will not halt the rollout. A staggeringly high number of consumers hold serious concerns about the possibility of their information getting stolen from everyday devices – their smart home, their tablet, their laptop. One would think therefore that this concern would pressure software manufacturers to be more rigorous in their pre-GA testing activities. Not so.

Why? Because so much of this IoT stuff is embedded and consumer awareness is mainly limited to the high profile exposures. Consumers are not hesitating to purchase connected devices because consumers do not know that the devices are connected.

Samsung’s SmartThings smart home platform is a leaky colander of loosely connected hack prone software. IoT security hardening is not just about the particular application but also about building security into the network connections that link applications and that link devices.

And then there is the “Data”. The amount of this stuff that is generated by IoT is intractably large. As few as 10,000 households can generate 215 million discrete data points every day. This creates more entry points for hackers and leaves sensitive information vulnerable.

The number and variety of privacy attack vectors becomes unmanageable very quickly. From the CIA hacking your Samsung TV, uBeacons doing their bit (uXDT & Audio Beacons – Introduce your Paranoia to your Imagination), hackers controlling your car, it’s a worryingly real threat to the personal security and privacy of every one of us.

If the CIA’s Directorate of Digital Innovation (DDI), who are tasked with delivering cyber-espionage tools and intelligence gathering capabilities, cannot even secure their own USB drives then what chance do the rest of us have.

Unfortunately the answer is that we have no chance.

ENDS 

“Bypassing” Encryption is the same as “Breaking” Encryption

According to the Vault 7 WikiLeaks data the CIA made phone malware that can read your private chats without breaking encryption.

Anyone with half a clue always knew that the best way to subvert encryption was to bypass encryption as we at TMG Corporate Services have always done. From our blog post Am I Being Surveilled? on 29th March 2016:

Still – the point is made I think – visual intercepts are economically viable even for local LE – it’s just an ultra low light wifi enabled pin-hole snake camera in the right spot. One above the driver and passenger seat belt brackets in a private vehicle is a good location (easy access to and plenty of space behind the plastic covering the B pillar to store the bits).

Five uninterrupted minutes and both are installed. Just wait for the target to take a Sunday drive and game on. Most people rest the handset on their lap while typing stationary in traffic or better still upright and in front or on top of the wheel when driving – using one hand – which gives a nice unobstructed keystroke by keystroke view of their typing activities.

Most successful hacks are low tech

Today I have seen a bunch of publications and experts trying to assure people that this is nothing to worry about. The purity of encryption is in tact. It is an academic point.

If you are in the business of handling sensitive data then don’t use your cell phone to transmit it. It’s that simple.

* In the hours since the documents were made available by WikiLeaks, a misconception was developed, making people believe the CIA “cracked” the encryption used by popular secure messaging software including Signal and WhatsApp.

WikiLeaks asserted that: “These techniques permit the CIA to bypass the encryption of WhatsApp, Signal, Telegram, Wiebo, Confide and Cloakman by hacking the “smart” phones that they run on and collecting audio and message traffic before encryption is applied.”

This statement by WikiLeaks made most people think that the encryption used by end-to-end encrypted messaging clients such as Signal and WhatsApp has been broken. No, it hasn’t. Instead, the CIA has tools to gain access to entire phones, which would of course “bypass” encrypted messaging apps because it fails all other security systems virtually on the phone, granting total remote access to the agency.

The WikiLeaks documents do not show any attack particular against Signal or WhatsApp, but rather the agency hijacks the entire phone and listens in before the applications encrypt and transmit information.

It’s like you are sitting in a train next to the target and reading his 2-way text conversation on his phone or laptop while he’s still typing, this doesn’t mean that the security of the app the target is using has any issue.

In that case, it also doesn’t matter if the messages were encrypted in transit if you are already watching everything that happens on the device before any security measure comes into play.

But this also doesn’t mean that this makes the issue lighter, as noted by NSA whistleblower Edward Snowden, “This incorrectly implies CIA hacked these apps/encryption. But the docs show iOS/Android are what got hacked—a much bigger problem.”

* From The Hacker News

ENDS

“All uR devICE r belong 2 US”, Vault 7, Weeping Angel, the CIA & Your Samsung TV

CIA malware and hacking tools are built by EDG (Engineering Development Group), a software development group within CCI (Center for Cyber Intelligence), a department belonging to the CIA’s DDI (Directorate for Digital Innovation). The DDI is one of the five major directorates of the CIA.

The attack against Samsung smart TVs was developed in cooperation with the United Kingdom’s MI5/BTSS.

The EDG is responsible for the development, testing and operational support of all backdoors, exploits, malicious payloads, trojans, viruses and any other kind of malware used by the CIA in its covert operations world-wide.

The increasing sophistication of surveillance techniques has drawn comparisons with George Orwell’s 1984, but “Weeping Angel”, developed by the CIA’s Embedded Devices Branch (EDB), which infests smart TVs, transforming them into covert microphones, is it’s most emblematic realization.

After infestation, Weeping Angel places the target TV in a ‘Fake-Off’ mode, so that the owner falsely believes the TV is off when it is on.

In ‘Fake-Off’ mode the TV operates as a bug, recording conversations in the room and sending them over the Internet to a covert CIA server.

ENDS

Extracted entirely from Vault 7: CIA Hacking Tools Revealed