Tag Archives: Compassion

Art For Action – Call for Pledges of Donations of Photography and Prints

Hello Everyone,

In preparation for our launch this December (31st) Art for Action (Twitter: @Art4Homeless) are calling for pledges of donations from artists and photographers.

It has been a pretty hectic process getting everything set up to support the charity and to ensure that we comply with the various regulations and to guarantee transparency for everyone involved.

Worthy of note before we say anything else is that all of the proceeds from the sale of donated art and photography will go to homeless charities in Ireland and the United Kingdom.

There will be no fees, no administration charges, no hidden this, that, and the other levied by Art for Action. All staff provide their services on a voluntary basis. Our founder is providing for the cost of all setup and ongoing costs. Some third party costs will be incurred in terms of payment processing fees and auction site fees and these will be paid from the purchase price of each piece – as is the norm – but that is it.

When the website launches there will be an entire section devoted to how Art for Action conducts its affairs and the accounts of the charity will be available for inspection by any member of the public – on request – without cost.

Call for Pledges of Donations – Artists, Photographers, Photojournalists

There are three ways to pledge:

1. Donate a digital version of your print to Art For Action and explicitly consent in writing that Art for Action have been granted the right to promote and resell the print and also specify the number of prints Art for Action can sell of this print, or specify unlimited;

2. Donate a printed version which the artist or photographer or photojournalist sends to our offices for resale;

3. Donate a printed, mounted, and framed version which is sent to our offices for resale;

All of the above choices are at the complete the discretion of the person donating their work. In each case the following information is also required:

  1. Title of the piece and description;
  2. A sample watermarked digital version of the piece (if applicable);
  3. A suggested guide price;
  4. Please email all details of donations (1-3 above) to Art4Action@intelography.com.

We are very grateful for your assistance and we look forward to publishing success stories throughout the coming years while improving the plight of the many people suffering from the effects of homelessness.

Thank you.

Homelessness as a Measure of a Nations Collective Empathy

Challenging events visit everyone during the course of their lives. The death of a loved one, the break down of a relationship, betrayal by someone that was trusted, problems with addiction, post traumatic stress, serious illness, mental health issues, or intractable financial problems amongst many, many others.

The most upsetting events often cause people to question long held views and opinions. In the end and after overcoming or dealing with the issue people tend to acquire a measure of wisdom and a deeper understanding of the world they live in and the people that live around them – many of whom may have been previously invisible to them.

Homeless people are invisible to almost everyone.

I was a homeless person at one point in my life, for various reasons. None of which I saw coming. The causes that resulted in my homelessness were composite – a series of creeping, evolving, and unforeseen events which over time produced that result.

I can therefore I think speak about the subject with a certain degree of authority. I do feel that it is important when commenting on social issues that personal experience informs the opinions expressed.

Theoretical analysis and opinions based on studying a subject or working with those impacted by an issue can help a person without first hand experience still express very valid observations or create policy or author legislation. But that too very much depends on the emotional intelligence of the person in question.

It is my opinion that in modern Ireland our politicians, commentators, policy makers, charities and agencies are populated with people who are professional wafflers with little or no understanding of the social context of many of the constituents who it is their duty to serve.

Homelessness is an unacceptable condition for even one citizen of this nation to be experiencing. I often overhear or hear first hand comments like – “junkie”, “alco”, “mental”, “gambler”, “irresponsible”, “get a job”, “work like the rest of us”, “lazy” – when people are discussing homelessness.

Life is lived on a knife edge, a slight deviation right or left on that knife edge can result in utter desolation.

Homelessness is not just the state of not having a home. It causes the afflicted to suffer myriad other side effects – humiliation, degradation, loneliness, to question self worth, hunger, and the kind of pain that hurts your soul.

Men, women and children in their thousands are being allowed to wallow in despairing hopelessness. After the initial furore surrounding street deaths of homeless people the debate has become muted and an attitude of resigned acceptance has once again settled in.

The collective empathy of a nation is measured by its attitude to certain phenomena. In Ireland, the Irish pride themselves on being welcoming, friendly and generous to visitors and market that internationally to attract tourists.

How I wonder would this sit with the opinion of the young man I walked past yesterday on the Ha’Penny Bridge on a sunny day in August with hundreds of others walking past him every hour – many in Dublin and Donegal jerseys on their way to “Croker” for the game. Smiling faces, laughter, ice creams, enjoyed in the company of family and friends.

And there he sat with a plastic cup that held of few brown coins and a look in his eyes that showed that he held little or no hope. He did not look angry. He did not look sad. He looked like he had come to the realisation that nobody and no one gave a damn one way or the other and that like the very few pieces of litter that blow around what was once “dirty Dublin” – he too was simply an object to be walked around while grimacing slightly.

Dublin does not suffer from a rubbish problem like it once did, instead now it’s streets contain human litter – the discarded elements of our society that Ireland has chosen to sacrifice in favour of austerity, cow-towing to the troika and gifting tax breaks to global conglomerates.

We should as a nation be thoroughly ashamed of ourselves for being the exact opposite to what we portray ourselves as.