Category Archives: Cybercrime

Top Cybersecurity Threats in Sport (2025)

On October 10th, 2017 at a panel discussion about “Cybersecurity of the Olympic Games” at the University Club, California Memorial Stadium – Missy Franklin, (five-time Olympic medalist) said “We constantly get new technology thrown at us. It’s crazy, but that’s where sports are going.”

Extract:Digital technologies pose an increasingly diverse set of threats to Olympic events, and the newer forms of threat are likely to have more serious consequences. While most hacks today focus on sports stadium IT systems and ticket operations, future risks will include hacks that cut to the integrity of the sporting event results, as well as to core stadiums operations.”

The study The Cybersecurity of Olympic Sports: New Opportunities, New Risks identifies eight key areas of risk for future sporting events:

  1. Stadium system hacks
  2. Scoring system hacks
  3. Photo and video replay hacks
  4. Athlete care hacks
  5. Entry manipulation
  6. Transportation hacks
  7. Hacks to facilitate terrorism or kidnapping
  8. Panic-inducing hacks

Key Olympic sports technology trends that represent several vectors of additional risk:

  1. Gymnastics
    1. Artificial intelligence in scoring
    2. Possible Surprises: Embedded tracking in gymnastics equipment
  2. Swimming
    1. Automated start/finish technology
    2. Possible Surprises: Biometrics in swimsuits
  3. Rowing
    1. Drones above race
    2. GPS tracking of boats
    3. Possible Surprises: Virtual reality real-time viewing
  4. Track & Field
    1. Automatic field event measurement
    2. Possible Surprises: 3D images for track finishes

Selected known cybersecurity incidents from the last three summer Olympic Games include:

BEIJING:

  1. Ticket scamming
  2. DDoS and related attacks against IT infrastructure

LONDON OLYMPICS:

  1. Ticket scamming
  2. DDoS and related attacks against IT infrastructure
  3. False alarm threat to the electrical grid

RIO OLYMPICS:

  1. Ticket scamming
  2. DDoS and related attacks against IT infrastructure
  3. Athlete data hack

END

Focus on Kaspersky hides facts of another NSA contractor theft

The Wall Street Journal based their story on the fact that another NSA contractor took classified documents home with him. Yet another Russian intelligence operation stole copies of those documents. The twist this time is that the Russians identified the documents because the contractor had Kaspersky Labs anti-virus installed on his home computer.

This is either an example of the Russians subverting a perfectly reasonable security feature in Kaspersky’s products, or Kaspersky adding a plausible feature at the request of Russian intelligence. In the latter case, it’s a nicely deniable Russian information operation. In either case, it’s an impressive Russian information operation.

This is a huge deal, both for the NSA and Kaspersky. The Wall Street Journal article contains no evidence, only unnamed sources. But I am having trouble seeing how the already embattled Kaspersky Labs survives this.

What’s getting a lot less press is yet another NSA contractor stealing top-secret cyberattack software. What is it with the NSA’s inability to keep anything secret anymore?

And it seems that Israeli intelligence penetrated the Kaspersky network and noticed the operation.

Full story on CRYPTO-GRAM October 15, 2017 by Bruce Schneier CTO, IBM Resilient schneier@schneier.com https://www.schneier.com

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Lyrics for a Surveillance Society – The Hacking Suite for Governmental Interception

Lyrics by Hacking Team. Music by Azerbaijan, Bahrain, Egypt, Ethiopia, Kazakhstan, Morocco, Nigeria, Oman, Saudi Arabia, Sudan, and several United States agencies including the DEA, FBI and Department of Defense.

Criminals and terrorists rely on mobile phones, tablets, lap tops and computers equipped with universal end-to-end encryption to hide their activity. Their secret communications and encrypted files can be critical to investigating, preventing and prosecuting crime. Hacking Team provides law enforcement an effective, easy-to-use solution. Law enforcement and intelligence communities worldwide rely on Hacking Team in their mission to keep citizens safe. The job has never been more challenging or more important.

You have new challenges today

Sensitive data is transmitted over encrypted channels

Often the information you want is not transmitted at all

Your target may be outside your monitoring domain

Is passive monitoring enough?

You need more ….

You want to look through your target’s eyes

You have to hack your target

While your target is …. Browsing the web, Exchanging documents, Receiving SMS, Crossing the borders

You have to hit many different platforms – Windows, OS X, Linux, Android, iOS, Blackberry, Windows Phone, Symbian

You have to overcome encryption and capture relevant data – Skype & Voice Calls, Social Media, Target Location, Messaging, Relationship, Audio & Video

Being stealth and untraceable

Immune to protection systems

Hidden collection infrastructure

Deployed all over your country

Up to hundreds of thousands of targets

All managed from a single place

Exactly what we do

Remote Control System – Galileo – The Hacking Suite for Governmental Interception

Hacking Team – Rely On Us

ENDS

Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault7 Leak #19 – Dumbo

Dumbo is a capability to suspend processes utilizing webcams and corrupt any video recordings that could compromise a PAG deployment. The PAG (Physical Access Group) is a special branch within the CCI (Center for Cyber Intelligence); its task is to gain and exploit physical access to target computers in CIA field operations. *

Vault7 Projects - Images - AAC Dumbo - PAG

The 3rd August 2017 WikiLeaks release overview:

Today, August 3rd 2017 WikiLeaks publishes documents from the Dumbo project of the CIA. Dumbo is a capability to suspend processes utilizing webcams and corrupt any video recordings that could compromise a PAG deployment. The PAG (Physical Access Group) is a special branch within the CCI (Center for Cyber Intelligence); its task is to gain and exploit physical access to target computers in CIA field operations. Dumbo can identify, control and manipulate monitoring and detection systems on a target computer running the Microsoft Windows operating sytem. It identifies installed devices like webcams and microphones, either locally or connected by wireless (Bluetooth, WiFi) or wired networks. All processes related to the detected devices (usually recording, monitoring or detection of video/audio/network streams) are also identified and can be stopped by the operator. By deleting or manipulating recordings the operator is aided in creating fake or destroying actual evidence of the intrusion operation. Dumbo is run by the field agent directly from an USB stick; it requires administrator privileges to perform its task. It supports 32bit Windows XP, Windows Vista, and newer versions of Windows operating system. 64bit Windows XP, or Windows versions prior to XP are not supported.

Log Excerpt:

Vault7 Projects - Images - AAC Dumbo - LOG

Eight documents were also published alongside this release:

Dumbo v3.0 — Field Guide

Dumbo v3.0 — User Guide

Dumbo v2.0 — Field Guide

Dumbo v2.0 — User Guide

Dumbo v1.0 — TDR Briefing

Dumbo v1.0 — User Guide

Dumbo Epione v1.0 — TDR Briefing

Dumbo Epione v1.0 — User Guide

Previous and subsequent Vault 7 WikiLeaks CIA document dump synopses are available via the Quick Reference Resource: WikiLeaks CIA Vault 7 Leaks

ENDS 

Welcome to the Jungle – Adolescent Hackers With Very Adult Problems

I won’t try to write about what those who are far better qualified * than me have already written ** or engage in debate about the pedigree of Marcus Hutchins ***. I am not a security researcher, I am not a hacker, I am not a programmer (anymore), and I am incredibly disinterested in trying to compete with far cleverer teenagers and young adults who would have me “pwned” in a matter of minutes.

The New Criminals

What many of the recently infamous hackers have in common, aside from being bright with little relevant experience which would make them capable of handling serious jail time, is that they do not know the way the world really works.

They seem to be unfamiliar with cause and effect. Many of them unknowingly thread the thin line between legality and illegality. In the evolving landscape of cyber-crime legislation what was quasi-legal and unregulated yesterday may be highly illegal tomorrow.

Most “security researchers” stay on the right side of the street but even in doing so they inevitably rub shoulders with those who are not. Something that aspiring researchers should remember is that “ignorance” is never a defence in a court of law. If and when someone chooses to wander across to the shadier side of the street (knowingly or unknowingly) they find themselves way out of their depth.

There is a very big gulf of reality between facing down a virtual opponent in a chatroom and eyeballing a professional interrogator in an “interview suite”. I have sat on both sides of that particular table, sometimes in places that the most intrepid backpacker wouldn’t consider going, and it is not a place that you want to be.

These are kids with very adult problems.

Dmitry Bogatov

Picture: Dmitry Bogatov

Welcome To The Jungle

Being a criminal or a member of an organized crime gang used to involve certain stages or rituals. It was a way of life sometimes forced on people as a result of their environment or poverty or family history or simply a conscious decision. Criminals are not always victims of circumstance.

For serious criminals it was an informed choice of sorts. It normally began with petty crime and graduated into more serious categories of crime as time passed. As the scale, sophistication, and seriousness of the crimes being committed grew so too did the tariff.

But the career criminal was more or less aware of this and the risk-return ratio. Also, to be effective in crime at the levels where it potentially attracted a forty year prison term, one had to have a network, contacts, tools, “pedigree”, and lots of other stuff. Not any more.

Jail sentences of these types for these hackers are not jail sentences, they are death sentences. Warming a concrete mattress in a concrete cage for twice as long as you have already been on the planet leaves these people with few choices.

They find themselves sharing space with men who have committed all sorts of crimes that actually involve leaving their mothers house. All of the lobbying and strongly worded letters from the Electronic Frontier Foundation, Amnesty International, family run crowd funding efforts, and emotional tweet storms will not help them when that door closes.

The phenomenon of the new criminals is highly contradictory. We now see fresh faced “deer in the headlights” types facing the sort of time that would make harder men cry for their mother.

Kimberly Crawley‍; 4th Aug 2017; “MalwareTechBlog and the Cybersecurity Community versus the FBI“; Peerlyst

** Kevin Beaumont; 5th Aug 2017; Regarding Marcus Hutchins aka MalwareTech; DoublePulsar

*** IPostYourInfo; 4th Aug 2017; The Marcus Hutchins I Knew; Medium

ENDS

Data Is The New Perimeter in Emerging Age of Corporate-Espionage-as-a-Service

Last Tuesday, July 11 2017 I was pleased to listen to Mike Desens, Vice President, IBM Z and LinuxONE Offering Management, IBM Systems as he took myself and some colleagues through a preview and introduction of the z14 prior to the July 17 announcements *.

The overriding theme of the briefing was that IBM view the z14 as “Designed for Trusted Digital Experiences”. The last twenty four months in particular have seen data breaches that have seriously eroded public confidence in erstwhile trusted institutions and organizations.

There have been hacks that have embarrassed nations, and led to real fears about the risk that insecure data poses to our energy and commercial infrastructures not to mention the veracity of election results but I am not going there.

Shadow Brokers dumps and WikiLeaks releases of alphabet agency backdoors and toolkits have given cyber criminals (even the opportunists), and terrorist outfits almost nuclear-grade hacking capability when compared to 2014.

IBM are hoping that these real fears, but more particularly their real solution, will be the key driver in convincing customers to adopt the new platform.

Been There, Done That

I have seen this before (IBM pinning their hopes of making the mainframe cool by leveraging an unexpected turn of events). I worked on the deep end of the ADSTAR Distributed Storage Manager (ADSM) ESP’s in the early 90’s (renamed Tivoli Storage Manager in 1999).

Back then entire banks ran on less DASD than your kid’s pot burner phone does right now (and that included all the IMS, CICS, and DB2 data). IBM pinned some of their hopes on maintaining their lucrative storage market share on ADSM in the face of EMC inroads. “Disk mirroring” however by EMC was the final blow when EMC turned an engineering weakness into a strength. It cost outsider Ed Zschau, ADSTAR Chairman and CEO, his job in 1995.

IBM had made a very valid argument for ADSM adoption. All that data on the newly acquired (mostly by accident and without permission by rogue business units – especially the capital markets mavericks), rapidly expanding, and poorly managed (in terms of Disaster Recover and Business Continuity at the very least) AS/400, Tandem, and NT infrastructure was best managed on the mainframe storage farm.

This also included using those new-fangled robotic tape libraries on Level 2 (which even appeared in a few movies with perspex exterior, the StorageTek one though, not the IBM Magstar 3494 Tape Library).

It didn’t work though. Mainly because the network couldn’t handle the volumes, and record level backup was never going to work to help reduce the bandwidth requirements to fit the overnight backup windows what with the quagmire of proprietary databases that had sprung up.

GDPR Unwittingly Making the Market for “Corporate-Espionage-As-A-Service”

But I digress so I will briefly digress again to another but equally valid potential driver for z adoption. And that is GDPR. Soon GDPR regulators will be gleefully fining corporates who fail to adequately protect their data the higher of EUR€20M or 4% of annual turnover, for each breach. That’s an instant laxative right there for the entire C-Suite.

But what the proposed GDPR penalty system also makes me wonder is how much of a market maker it is (unwittingly) for Corporate-Espionage-As-A-Service (CEAAS) and Industrial-Espionage-As-A-Service (IEAAS).

Back On Message – Pervasive Encryption

Consequently, IBM have put security at the core of the new platform with “Pervasive Encryption as the new standardAnalytics & Machine Learning for Continuous Intelligence Across the Enterprise, and Open Enterprise Cloud to Extend, Connect and Innovate”.

Here are some stats to keep your CISO awake:

  1. Nearly 5.5 million records are stolen per day, 230,367 per hour and 3,839 per minute (Source:http://breachlevelindex.com/);
  2. Of the 9 Billion records breached since 2013 only 4% were encrypted (Source: http://breachlevelindex.com/);
  3. 26% is the likelihood of an organization having a data breach in the next 24 months(Source: https://www.ibm.com/security/infographics/data-breach/) ;
  4. The greatest security mistake organizations make is failing to protect their networks and data from internal threats. (Source: https://digitalguardian.com/blog/expert-guide-securing-sensitive-data-34-experts-reveal-biggest-mistakes-companies-make-data)

The Z is arguably more powerful, more open and more secure than any commercial system on the planet and the box makes serious moves in the rapidly evolving domains of Machine Learning, Cloud and Blockchain. But again and again the focus comes back to Pervasive Encryption and that is the potential seismic shift that just might make the Z the go-to platform for organisations who can afford their own and the Cloud platform of choice for those who cannot.

Pervasive Encryption Is The New Standard

Back in the day as an MVS370 systems programmer I stressed about downtimes, availability stats, and the SLAs with business units. If I am being honest though I mostly stressed about the long holiday weekends spent in subterranean data centers upgrading ESP code or patching or migrating new releases from TEST to PROD LPARS or doing S390 disk mirrors.

Therefore when I first heard of the this bold new “encrypt it all” call to arms I wondered what the price for this would be in terms of the social lives and general marital stability of SPs globally.

However I am assured that the encryption “migration” involves no application changes, no impact to SLA’s, and that all of this application and database data can be encrypted without interrupting business applications and operations.

What’s Under the Hood

This section of the briefing was prefaced with the statement that the Z will deliver “unrivalled performance for secure workloads.” I have another post in the works with the tech spec dets on the encryption under the hood but for now here’s the 60k foot view:

“Industry exclusive protected key encryption, enabled through integration with a tamper- responding cryptographic HSM. All in-flight network data and API’s, true end-to-end data protection. 4x increase in silicon area allocated to cryptographic operations. 4 – 7x faster encryption of data with enhanced cryptographic performance. 18x fasterencryption than competition at 1/20th the cost to implement. 2x performance boost on Crypto Express6S. Securing the cloud by encrypting APIs 2-3x faster than x86 systems. Linux exploits Protected Key encryption for data at-rest.”

More later.

* From an article originally published on July 18 2017 on my Peerlyst blog

ENDS

IBM Mainframe Ushers in New Era of Data Protection with Pervasive Encryption

Main take-outs in IBM Z Systems announcement:

  1. Pervasively encrypts data, all the time at any scale;
  2. Addresses global data breach epidemic;
  3. Helps automate compliance for EU General Data Protection Regulation, Federal Reserve and other emerging regulations;
  4. Encrypts data 18x faster than compared x86 platforms, at 5 percent of the cost (Source: “Pervasive Encryption: A New Paradigm for Protection,” K. R. E. Lind, Chief Systems Engineer, Solitaire Interglobal Ltd., June 30, 2017);
  5. Announces six IBM Cloud Blockchain data centers with IBM Z as encryption engine;
  6. Delivers groundbreaking Container Pricing for new solutions, such as instant payments.

The new data encryption capabilities are designed to address the global epidemic of data breaches, a major factor in the $8 trillion cybercrime impact on the global economy by 2022. Of the more than nine billion data records lost or stolen since 2013, only four percent were encrypted, making the vast majority of such data vulnerable to organized cybercrime rings, state actors and employees misusing access to sensitive information.

In the most significant re-positioning of mainframe technology in more than a decade, when the platform embraced Linux and open source software, IBM Z now dramatically expands the protective cryptographic umbrella of the world’s most advanced encryption technology and key protection. The system’s advanced cryptographic capability now extends across any data, networks, external devices or entire applications – such as the IBM Cloud Blockchain service – with no application changes and no impact on business service level agreements.

“The vast majority of stolen or leaked data today is in the open and easy to use because encryption has been very difficult and expensive to do at scale,” said Ross Mauri, General Manager, IBM Z. “We created a data protection engine for the cloud era to have a significant and immediate impact on global data security.”

ENDS

* From an article originally published on July 17 2017 on my Peerlyst blog