Category Archives: Bitcoin

Using Stylometry DHS have id’d Bitcoin creator Nakamoto with help from NSA PRISM & MUSCULAR programs

Allegedly using word surveillance and stylometry the effort took less than a month. Apparently using encryption and complex obfuscation methods is not a defence when the “seeker” has access to trillions of writing samples from a billion or so people across the globe.

By taking Satoshi’s texts and finding the 50 most common words, the NSA was able to break down his text into 5,000 word chunks and analyse each to find the frequency of those 50 words. This would result in a unique 50-number identifier for each chunk. The NSA then placed each of these numbers into a 50-dimensional space and flatten them into a plane using principal components analysis. The result is a ‘fingerprint’ for anything written by Satoshi that could easily be compared to any other writing.

It is worth noting that the original post is littered with comments that request more details on the source of the information that informed the post or some other such proof of the veracity of the claims being made but the author declared in response:

Many readers have asked that I provide third party citations to ‘prove’ the NSA identified Satoshi using stylometry. Unfortunately, I cannot as I haven’t read this anywhere else — hence the reason I wrote this post. I’m not trying to convince the reader of anything, instead my goal is to share the information I received and make the reader aware of the possibility that the NSA can easily determine the authorship of any email through the use of their various sources, methods, and resources.

Many readers have asked who Satoshi is and I’ve made it clear that information wasn’t shared with me. Based on my conversation I got the impression (never confirmed) that he might have been more than one person. This made me think that perhaps the Obama administration was right that Bitcoin was created by a state actor. One person commented on this post that Satoshi was actually four people. Again, I have no idea.

If it is true then “The moral of the story? You can’t hide on the internet anymore. Your sentence structure and word use is MORE unique than your own fingerprint. If an organization, like the NSA, wants to find you [sic] they will.

Full story by Alexander Muse is on Medium.

ENDS

Surveillance Self Defense Advice from the Electronic Frontier Foundation

Choosing the VPN That’s Right for You What’s a VPN? VPN stands for “Virtual Private Network.” It enables a computer to send and receive data across shared or public networks as if it is directly connected to the private network—benefiting from the functionality, security, and management policies of the private network.

What is a VPN Good For?

You can use a VPN to connect to the corporate intranet at your office while you’re traveling abroad, while you are at home, or any other time you are out of the office.

You can also use a commercial VPN to encrypt your data as it travels over a public network, such as the Wi-Fi in an Internet café or a hotel. You can use a commercial VPN to circumvent Internet censorship on a network that blocks certain sites or services.

For example, some Chinese users use commercial VPNs to access websites blocked by the Great Firewall. You can also connect to your home network by running your own VPN service, using open source software such as OpenVPN.

What Doesn’t a VPN Do?

A VPN protects your Internet traffic from surveillance on the public network, but it does not protect your data from people on the private network you’re using. If you are using a corporate VPN, then whoever runs the corporate network will see your traffic. If you are using a commercial VPN, whoever runs the service will be able to see your traffic.

A disreputable VPN service might do this deliberately, to collect personal information or other valuable data.

The manager of your corporate or commercial VPN may also be subject to pressure from governments or law enforcement to turn over information about the data you have sent over the network.

You should review your VPN provider’s privacy policy for information about the circumstances under which your VPN provider may turn your data over to governments or law enforcement. You should also take note of the countries in which the VPN provider does business. The provider will be subject to the laws in those countries, which may include both legal requests for your information from that government, and other countries with whom it has a legal assistance treaty.

In some cases, the laws will allow for requests without notice to you or an opportunity to contest the request.

Most commercial VPNs will require you to pay using a credit card, which includes information about you that you may not want to divulge to your VPN provider. If you would like to keep your credit card number from your commercial VPN provider, you may wish to use a VPN provider that accepts Bitcoin, or use temporary or disposable credit card numbers.

Also, please note that the VPN provider may still collect your IP address when you use their service, which can be used to identify you, even if you use an alternative payment method. If you would like to hide your IP address from your VPN provider, you may wish to use Tor when connecting to your VPN.

Republished without editing from the article Choosing the VPN That’s Right for You published and last updated on 2016-06-09 by The Electronic Frontier Foundation.

END