My Privacy Lobotomy or How I Learned to Stop Worrying & Love the IP Act

(Please Note: This post is a partial reblog. The re-blogged bits are all the bits under the Malcolm Tucker “grenade app” GIF – Featured Image “Bring me Corbyn, Solo & the Wookie” (Credit to @Trouteyes on Twitter))

After weeks of posting hysterical objections to and concerns about the Investigatory Powers Act I now realise that I was worrying needlessly. It suddenly occurred to me that the Investigatory Powers Act is nothing that I should worry about at all. This radical change of heart came as a result of the following statement from the Home Office which Dave Howe on Peerlyst kindly sent to me:

“The safeguards in this Act reflect the UK’s international reputation for protecting human rights. The unprecedented transparency and the new safeguards – including the ‘double lock’ for the most sensitive powers – set an international benchmark for how the law can protect both Privacy and security.”

This is the civil servant who issued the statement:

author

The patronisingly misleading statement has caused me to make an immediate and unconditional U-Turn on my previous opinion of the legislation.

I am now immensely grateful to Theresa May and everyone who had a part in authoring this document. Hopefully it will soon take it’s rightful place alongside the Magna Carta and the Bill of Rights as milestones in the relentless march toward a privacy protected, liberty guaranteed and freedom based utopia.

tucker

Hardly Anyone Has Access To All My Data

Access to my internet connection records is set out in Schedule 4 of the Act and it only says that the following forty plus departments and about 600,000 government employees can mine my private life:

  • Metropolitan Police force
  • City of London Police force
  • Police Forces maintained under section 2 of the Police Act 1996
  • Police Service of Scotland
  • Police Service of Northern Ireland
  • British Transport Police
  • Ministry of Defence Police
  • Royal Navy Police
  • Royal Military Police
  • Royal Air Force Police
  • Security Service
  • Secret Intelligence Service
  • GCHQ
  • Ministry of Defence
  • Department of Health
  • Home Office
  • Ministry of Justice
  • National Crime Agency
  • HM Revenue & Customs
  • Department for Transport
  • Department for Work and Pensions
  • NHS trusts and foundation trusts in England that provide ambulance services
  • Common Services Agency for the Scottish Health Service
  • Competition and Markets Authority
  • Criminal Cases Review Commission
  • Department for Communities in Northern Ireland
  • Department for the Economy in Northern Ireland
  • Department of Justice in Northern Ireland
  • Financial Conduct Authority Fire and rescue authorities under the Fire and Rescue Services Act 2004
  • Food Standards Agency
  • Food Standards Scotland
  • Gambling Commission
  • Labour Abuse Authority
  • Health and Safety Executive
  • Independent Police Complaints Commissioner
  • Information Commissioner
  • NHS Business Services Authority
  • Northern Ireland Ambulance Service Health and Social Care Trust
  • Northern Ireland Fire and Rescue Service Board
  • Northern Ireland Health and Social Care Regional Business Services Organisation
  • Office of Communications Office of the Police Ombudsman for Northern Ireland
  • Police Investigations and Review Commissioner
  • Scottish Ambulance Service Board
  • Scottish Criminal Cases Review Commission
  • Serious Fraud Office
  • Welsh Ambulance Services National Health Service Trust

Hackers

Bulk surveillance of the population and dozens of public authorities with the power to access your internet connection records is a grim turn of events for a democracy.

Unfortunately, bulk collection and storage will also create an irresistible target for malicious actors, massively increasing the risk that your personal data will end up in the hands of:

  • People able to hack / infiltrate your ISP
  • People able to hack / infiltrate your Wi-Fi hotspot provider
  • People able to hack / infiltrate your mobile network operator
  • People able to hack / infiltrate a government department or agency
  • People able to hack / infiltrate the government’s new multi-database request filter

If the events of the past few years are anything to go by, it won’t take long for one or more of these organisations to suffer a security breach. Assuming, of course, that the powers that be manage not to just lose all of your personal data in the post.

So – nothing to worry about at all.

END

One thought on “My Privacy Lobotomy or How I Learned to Stop Worrying & Love the IP Act

  1. Pingback: The Irish PM, Cabinet Ministers & Head of Police Force use Gmail for Official Business | AirGap Anonymity Collective

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